A proper Minecraft server – Windows

Yes there are plenty of Minecraft server how to guides on the net but here is my take on it and how to host a server with a ISP that doesn’t like their subscribers hosting games.

This guide is for Windows. Not to mention a 64bit version.

Back in the day setting up any game server would be an all day event. However the Minecraft server is pretty simple.
The flavor of Minecraft for this is the Tekkit Legends mod. It has many mods cobbled together and makes things much easier to set up.

Download the server software from here.
decompress the zip file and move it to a location on your hard drive. For an example C:\Games\Minecraft-server

There is a BATCH file called start.bat. Right click the file and select edit.
Delete all the contents of the file and copy and paste this.
java -Xmx1024M -d64 -jar “TekkitLegends.jar” nogui
pause

The server will use a maximum of 1GB of ram, forces it to use the 64bit of Java and everything runs on a DOS like terminal screen to save some CPU cycles. You can tweak the ram usage if you wish but if you plan to also play the game on the same machine then I wouldn’t change it. Save the file and exit notepad.

Before we go any further we need to make sure a 64bit version of Java is installed. Open a command prompt terminal by clicking on start and type in CMD. In the prompt window run this command java -version. The output should be something like this.
java version “1.8.0_101”
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_101-b13)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.101-b13, mixed mode)
If it does not say 64-Bit then you’ll have to uninstall Java and install a 64bit version. I would stick with the 8u101. Select the Windows x64 Offline to download. After it’s downloaded then uninstall Java from the Control Panel/ Programs/ Programs and Features. After uninstalling you can install the proper 64-bit version. Take note, I had the 64bit already on my system but when the latest update came out the system updated to the 32bit and kinda screw things up. To fix it I had to modify the environment path and removed the listing pointing to the 32bit version.

After you have finished installing Java 64-Bit you can do a quick test run of the minecraft server. This test run will create some sample files and help speed things along when doing the final configuration. If there isn’t any issues then you can exit the server and find the file in the Minecraft server root directory called server.properties.
Open it with notepad and it should look like this.

#Minecraft server properties
generator-settings=
op-permission-level=4
allow-nether=false
level-name=world
enable-query=false
allow-flight=true
announce-player-achievements=true
rcon.password=password
server-port=25565
level-type=DEFAULT
enable-rcon=true
force-gamemode=false
level-seed=
server-ip=
max-build-height=256
spawn-npcs=true
white-list=false
spawn-animals=true
hardcore=false
snooper-enabled=true
online-mode=false
resource-pack=
pvp=true
difficulty=0
enable-command-block=false
gamemode=1
player-idle-timeout=0
max-players=20
rcon.port=25575
spawn-monsters=false
generate-structures=false
view-distance=10
motd=Minecraft Server!!!!

Just copy and paste what you see here but change the following two lines highlighted in blue. Last thing you want is some one hacking your server. Take note this server setup is for creative mode and now creature spawning. It’s mostly setup for just building crap.

Save and exit notepad. Now the server is finished however there is still some work to be done. Since RCON is enabled we need to access RCON. For myself I have a dual monitor setup so one monitor has the server terminal and a RCON terminal and the other monitor has the game (client side) running. There are a few RCON clients and even a few for Android and iOS if you wish to use a smart phone/tablet. For this example we will use MCRCON. It’s a very little simple tool and you can run single commands or have a terminal session. I prefer a terminal session so I can change server values on the fly.

Unzip the file and copy the contents and paste them into the Minecraft server root directory. There is another BATCH file but we can just simply run it. Just follow the instructions and answer the questions. If you’re running the RCON terminal on the same machine then just use the IP address 127.0.0.1.

Now this step is optional but I like doing it so I can be sure the server is running with Administrative rights. A little program that converts a BATCH file to a typical executive file called Bat2Exe. Just convert the BATCH file that loads the server and also go ahead and convert the RCON batch file that was created. This way you can create a shortcut and select it to run with Admin rights. Sadly you can’t just do this with a BATCH file. You can but requires extra steps and what not. This method just makes things easier in the end.

Over the years ISPs have become more strict on the bandwidth usage. Granted you can chew it up with streaming video from Netflix and YouTube but they hate it when users host games and websites. So we need a VPN like tunnel for friends to connect and play. There are tons of options but the easiest one out there is Hamachi. Just follow the install and create a VPN and give the login details to your friends. For users to connect to the Minecraft server they just select Multiplayer and select direct connect. The address they use is what is listed on the VPN that will be displayed on the Hamachi window.

 

Now if you wish to do this with Linux I will probably create another post for Linux. It’s kinda the same deal but with Linux we have to replace the OpenJDK with the Oracle version and stuff like that. Hamachi and MCRCON are cross-platform so it will make things a bit easier.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s